Tobacco Cessation

I saw a statistic the other day that made me do a double take. There was an article in the local paper that referenced health research related to tobacco use and it stated that worldwide, tobacco use causes nearly 6 million deaths per year. Wow. That was a shock for me. I think with all the progress we’ve made here in the US in the last decade around creating smoke-free environments in schools, hospitals, restaurants, and so forth, I was under the false impression that tobacco use had declined greatly and just wasn’t a big problem anymore. Clearly, I was wrong.

The public health profession has made great strides in battling “Big Tobacco” at both the policy and individual levels. Overall, there has been a downward trend in cigarette use among students and adults. Data from 2015 indicate that many adults want to quit smoking and/or tried to quit in the past year.  That is great news. On the other hand, we are seeing an increase in the use of e-cigarettes, particularly among young adults, who may believe that they are a safer alternative to traditional cigarettes or smokeless tobacco products. E-cigarettes do not contain tobacco, but according to the CDC, they are not considered a safe alternative to tobacco use.

If you use any form of tobacco products or e-cigarettes, the best thing you can do for your health is quit. If quitting completely seems like too daunting a challenge for you, then consider reducing your use gradually until you are ready to quit. The nicotine available in these products is what causes the addiction and the craving to smoke or use other forms of tobacco. The good news is that there are many tools, resources and medications available today that help make quitting easier than ever. You don’t have to do it alone. In fact, social support is an important factor for anyone who is trying to reduce or stop using tobacco.

If you are thinking about quitting or are ready to make a change now, consider the following resources and strategies to help you on your journey to stop using tobacco:

Talk to your doctor: S/he can talk to you about medications to help you quit and put you in contact with local resources.

Call a quitline: Talking to someone about quitting smoking can be the support you might need to see it through. All states have quitlines with counselors who are trained specifically to help smokers quit. Call 800-QUIT-NOW (800-784-8669) to connect directly to your state’s quitline.

Contact your employer or health insurance company about resources for quitting: Many employers offer free tobacco cessation programs to help employees quit. If you are not working, inquire with your health insurance company as they often have trained specialists available by phone and/or may offer free or low-cost nicotine replacement products. Even Medicare Part B (Medical Insurance) covers up to 8 face-to-face visits with an approved provider in a 12-month period.

Consider behavioral therapy or coaching: This involves working with a counselor or a health coach to find ways not to smoke or use other forms of tobacco. Together, you’ll identify your triggers (such as emotions or situations that make you want to use tobacco) and make a plan to get through the cravings.

Whether you decide to quit cold turkey or use a combination of options to help you on this journey, know that the first few days are the toughest. You’ll probably feel irritable, depressed, and tired, especially if you’re quitting cold turkey. Identify your support system beforehand, whether it be a good friend, a colleague and/or a quitline specialist, and use them in times of need. Once you get past those first days, you’ll begin to feel more normal and your cravings should begin to decrease.

Finally, be sure to build in ways to reward yourself. What you’re doing isn’t easy. When you achieve the smaller milestones on your way to quitting, treat yourself with something you want or enjoy.  Or another idea is to save the money you would have spent on cigarettes/tobacco products and donate it to a favorite charity. This is a win-win situation – you are helping yourself and others at the same time.

Quitting isn’t easy, but 50 million ex-smokers in the United States are proof that it’s possible.  What step can you take today to move you closer to the goal of quitting?

notobacco

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