Assessing current health

Once a client has identified their vision of optimal health and wellbeing and why it is important for them to make changes in their health behaviors, it is helpful to perform a more comprehensive health assessment. This assessment can include input from a number of different sources including medical lab tests and diagnostics, a health risk assessment, recommendations from healthcare providers as well as any number of self-assessments around physical and mental health.

Even if a client comes to coaching with a specific focus area in mind, I find it is beneficial to have them complete a comprehensive self-assessment. Doing so may clarify what area(s) they most want to work on, or it may provide insight into areas that they did not realize were impacting their health. So many of our health behaviors are inter-connected, so taking a step back to look at the big picture can actually help a client identify the most important area(s) in need of change.

The self-assessment tool that I use with clients is the Current and Desired States Questionnaire. This self-assessment asks clients to rate their current and desired states of health on a scale of 1-10 for each area of the Wheel of Health. Doing so provides valuable input to clients as they prepare to select an area of health and wellbeing to focus on and set specific goals. In addition to rating each area, clients can document the reasons why they chose their current rating as well as what changes they could make to help them get to their desired level.

I usually give clients the questionnaire prior to our first meeting so they have time to complete it beforehand. This allows us to discuss the results in our time together. Before jumping into the specifics, I often begin with questions that ask the client about their experience completing the assessment and looking at their health in this way. For example, I may ask:

 

  • What was your experience in completing this assessment? What stood out most to you?
  • What, if anything, surprised you about your responses?

 

After discussing the general experience of completing the questionnaire, I then help the client explore specific areas on the assessment to help them prepare for the next step in the process, which is choosing a specific focus area. We often don’t have time to review each question in detail, so I typically use more general inquiry such as:

 

  • What are the areas in which you feel strong? What supports those areas of strength?
  • What are the areas where you would like to see some improvement or change?

 

Many times, clients will have more than one area in which they would like to improve. Given that behavior change takes time and can be difficult, I emphasize to clients that they do not have to take on all of their desired changes at one time. In fact, clients are strongly encouraged to work on only one area at a time. Studies have shown that the greatest success comes from choosing a focus area where the client will achieve results that are important to them and they are most likely to do well. Achieving a series of small wins in the early stages of behavior change can help a client stay motivated on their path to improved health and wellbeing.

As you can imagine, health assessment is not a static part of the coaching process. Depending on how long a client stays engaged in coaching, I will have them revisit and reassess their status along the way. Repeating the Current and Desired States Questionnaire at the end of the coaching process is also a wonderful way for the client to assess and celebrate the progress they have made and look at what changes they may want to continue with in the future.

Using one or more assessment tools is an excellent way to help clients clarify and prioritize what area of their health they want to focus on, particularly if there are multiple areas they want to change or improve. Self-assessment can also be an insightful part of the self-discovery journey that unfolds as part of the coaching experience.

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