Finding your “why”

In continuing to explore the various stages of the health coaching process model, today I will review the second stage: identifying and prioritizing the elements of the client’s vision that are most important to them and reflect significant values in their life.

The purpose of exploring client values is twofold:
1. it sets the stage for determining specific areas the client would like to address, and
2. it helps establish their real motivation for behavior change

As most of us know, behavior change can be very difficult. It takes time, effort and discipline to establish new habits or break old habits. Therefore, connecting the behavior change to those things that are most important to the client will help them embrace the change and work through the obstacles and barriers they may encounter along their journey. I like to call this stage “finding your ‘why’” as it gets at the true reason(s) the client wants to change.

The values associated with a client’s health and wellbeing may include things like spending time with family, serving their community, or being a role model to their children. Their values may also tie into their faith and spiritual beliefs. The desire to change may be tied to short-term plans or longer-term goals. For example, a mother may desire to lose weight now in order to look and feel good at her child’s upcoming wedding, but she may also want to do so to have the energy to run around with her future grandchildren.

To help a client articulate their values, I typically ask one or more of the following questions:

  • What is important to you about your health and wellbeing?

 

  • What really matters to you in your life?

 

  • What brings you joy and happiness?

 

  • What values are you honoring as you move toward your vision of optimal health and wellbeing?

Some clients may initially find it difficult to answer these questions. Many times, they may seek coaching because they feel they “have to” or “should” change a particular behavior (e.g., lose weight, start exercising, stop smoking). By exploring values and what is most important to them about their health, they may identify a different area or behavior they want to change. Clients are more likely to be successful if they choose an area they want to change versus one they feel like they need to change for external reasons.

As mentioned earlier, one of the most important reasons to help a client identify their “why” is to help them work through the challenges and obstacles that are likely to arise on their way to better health. When a client is knee deep in the action phase, perhaps waking up at the crack of dawn to fit in their daily exercise, there are bound to be days when they don’t want to do it. It is on those days and at those times of lagging motivation when the client can pause and ask themselves, “Why am I doing this again?” – and they will have their answer.

 

what is your why

Relationships and Communication

Relationships

As the holidays approach, it means many of us will be spending time with family, friends and other loved ones. Depending on your relationship with these individuals, this togetherness may bring feelings of joy and happiness, but it can also bring sadness, disappointment and even pain. Our social relationships have a direct impact on our health and wellbeing, for better or for worse.

Research has shown that individuals who have satisfying relationships with family, friends, and their community are happier, have fewer health problems, and live longer. It is beneficial to periodically assess the quality of your social relationships and how they are impacting your health and wellbeing.

A few questions to consider as you assess the stability and satisfaction with your current relationships include:

  • Does the relationship contribute to a sense of belonging, security, purpose and/or self-worth?
  • Do you have a variety of social outlets, from casual acquaintances to one or two close friends who can provide support when needed?
  • Do you foster those relationships in which you feel supported and energized? And conversely, do you minimize contact in those relationships that are conflicted and/or drain your energy?

You may also want to think about the impact of your relationships based on the other areas of the Wheel of Health. For example, do you have relationships that can support you in meeting your nutrition and exercise goals? Are your spiritual beliefs and experiences supported, or perhaps challenged, by your relationships? What impact do your close relationships have on your personal growth and development?

Communication

One of the most important factors in maintaining healthy relationships is effective communication. Whether you want to sustain your supportive relationships or improve your difficult ones, improving the way you communicate can be key. Below are three components of effective communication skills you may want to assess personally:

Listening. Think about the last time you thought someone really listened to you. How did it feel to have their complete attention? Most likely, that person demonstrated the following behaviors or characteristics:

  • The listener was not in a rush, paid attention to what you were saying and held space for you to share what was on your mind. S/he was present with you, mentally and physically.
  • The listener did not rush to judge or criticize what you were saying, and refrained from injecting his or her own opinions about what you had to say.
  • The listener let you know you were heard by reflecting or paraphrasing what you said and/or by asking clarifying questions.
  • The listener used non-verbal behaviors, such as consistent eye contact and nodding, to indicate that s/he was present and focused on you.

The next time you want to engage in active listening, select one of the above characteristics and consciously practice it. See if it makes a difference in the relationship to the person to whom you are listening.

Inquiry. True inquiry comes from a place of genuine curiosity about another person. It is not just asking questions for the sake of carrying on a conversation. It can be accomplished using open-ended questions, that are not easily answered with just a “yes” or “no.” Open-ended questions typically begin with “what” or “how.” For example, rather than asking “Did you have a good day at school?,” you might ask “What was the best part about school today?”

If you want to practice the skill of inquiry, consider the use of “I” statements. This approach allows each person to have his or her own opinions, thoughts, and beliefs. Some examples include:

“You” statement: “You don’t understand me.”

vs.

“I” statement: “I’m not sure I am making myself clear.”

 

“You” statement: “You are no help at all!”

vs.

“I” statement: “I feel overworked and would appreciate some extra help.”

 

“You” statement: “You are always late!”

vs.

“I” statement: “I feel anxious when you don’t arrive on time.”

If you are not already using “I” statements, you may want to try this approach and see if doing so has a positive impact on communication with your colleagues, friends and family.

Communication styles. Being aware of your communication style can help you choose the one that best fits the specific circumstance and promotes open and effective communication. There are four basic styles of communicating:

  • Aggressive: Getting what you want at another person’s expense. This style typically involves a loud voice, insults, dominating posture and a lack of listening.

 

  • Passive: Allowing another person to have what they want at your expense, often to avoid conflict. This style usually involves a quiet voice and demeanor, a meek posture and little room to express your own feelings or desires.

 

  • Assertive: Balancing what you want with what another person wants. This style generally involves a firm, moderate tone of voice, and communication that includes both listening and the use of “I” statements.

 

  • Passive Aggressive: Attempting to get what you want in an indirect or calculating way. Communication is often not direct but leading and manipulative. Tone of voice and posture vary depending on what you think will get you what you want with the other person or in that particular moment.

Different situations call for different communication styles. There is benefit in being competent in more than one style, and being able to use the style that the situation calls for. Being aware of what style of communication you are using and choosing intentionally can be beneficial in promoting the kinds of relationships you want to have.