Finding your “why”

In continuing to explore the various stages of the health coaching process model, today I will review the second stage: identifying and prioritizing the elements of the client’s vision that are most important to them and reflect significant values in their life.

The purpose of exploring client values is twofold:
1. it sets the stage for determining specific areas the client would like to address, and
2. it helps establish their real motivation for behavior change

As most of us know, behavior change can be very difficult. It takes time, effort and discipline to establish new habits or break old habits. Therefore, connecting the behavior change to those things that are most important to the client will help them embrace the change and work through the obstacles and barriers they may encounter along their journey. I like to call this stage “finding your ‘why’” as it gets at the true reason(s) the client wants to change.

The values associated with a client’s health and wellbeing may include things like spending time with family, serving their community, or being a role model to their children. Their values may also tie into their faith and spiritual beliefs. The desire to change may be tied to short-term plans or longer-term goals. For example, a mother may desire to lose weight now in order to look and feel good at her child’s upcoming wedding, but she may also want to do so to have the energy to run around with her future grandchildren.

To help a client articulate their values, I typically ask one or more of the following questions:

  • What is important to you about your health and wellbeing?

 

  • What really matters to you in your life?

 

  • What brings you joy and happiness?

 

  • What values are you honoring as you move toward your vision of optimal health and wellbeing?

Some clients may initially find it difficult to answer these questions. Many times, they may seek coaching because they feel they “have to” or “should” change a particular behavior (e.g., lose weight, start exercising, stop smoking). By exploring values and what is most important to them about their health, they may identify a different area or behavior they want to change. Clients are more likely to be successful if they choose an area they want to change versus one they feel like they need to change for external reasons.

As mentioned earlier, one of the most important reasons to help a client identify their “why” is to help them work through the challenges and obstacles that are likely to arise on their way to better health. When a client is knee deep in the action phase, perhaps waking up at the crack of dawn to fit in their daily exercise, there are bound to be days when they don’t want to do it. It is on those days and at those times of lagging motivation when the client can pause and ask themselves, “Why am I doing this again?” – and they will have their answer.

 

what is your why

It all starts with a vision

Happy New Year! I hope that you all had a wonderful holiday season and are optimistic about the new adventures that 2019 will bring. I thought it would be helpful to kick off the new year by reviewing the stages of the health coaching process model, beginning today with the first stage: creating an optimal health vision.

Laying the foundation

As a health and wellness coach, my primary purpose is to help individuals learn how to optimize their health and wellbeing, with an emphasis on the latter. Miriam-Webster defines wellbeing as “the state of being happy, healthy, or prosperous.” Obviously, there is some subjectivity in that definition as health, happiness and prosperity may look different for everyone…which is one reason why the initial stage in the coaching process is for the client to identify their vision of optimal health and wellbeing.

The visioning stage provides an opportunity for the client to take a broad look at their current state of health and wellbeing in preparation for developing a personalized health plan, with goals and action steps. Visioning allows clients to think about the “big picture” of health and wellbeing in their life and helps serve as part of the motivation for change.

There are a number of different strategies that coaches can use to help clients identify their optimal health vision, such as:

  1. Sending written questions regarding vision to the client to complete ahead of time and then discuss during the next session. This approach may be helpful for clients that like to take time to think things through and process questions before sharing with the coach.

 

  1. Asking open-ended questions regarding vision during the coaching session. This method may be better suited for clients who do not like “homework” and/or enjoy processing by talking things through as they go. Some example questions include:

 

  • What is your vision of yourself in your greatest health?
  • What do you look like? How do you feel?
  • What inspires you about this vision of optimal health and wellbeing?
  • What does achieving your vision of optimal health make possible in your life?

 

  1. Offering a short, guided imagery exercise to assist the client in developing their health vision. I often use the “future self” exercise, in which clients are asked to imagine themselves sometime in the future when they have achieved their vision of optimal health. Clients then paint a picture of what that looks like by describing how they look and feel, the activities they are enjoying, who they are with and what health behaviors they are engaged in (e.g., exercise, eating healthy). If the client tends to be a visual person, I invite them to capture their vision on paper with words and/or images.

For many clients, identifying their vision of optimal health may be linked with a personal mission or life purpose. It may stimulate a sense of who they are meant to be or how they want to contribute to their community and beyond. Visioning allows clients to see how their specific focus of change serves their larger intention for themselves. And perhaps most importantly, it sets the stage for identifying specific goals and action steps that will help the client achieve their vision.

Although coaches help elicit a vision at the beginning of the coaching process, we return to visioning throughout the change process, especially after a client has initiated action. Behavior change is rarely a linear process and a client’s motivation to change will ebb and flow. It can be helpful to revisit the client’s vision after they have experienced positive changes, to reinforce how their action is serving their overall vision. Or revisiting the vision may help reignite their desire to change when they are feeling stagnant or stuck. Visioning is a key thread woven throughout the entire coaching process.

Stay tuned for the next part of the coaching process which is helping clients identify what they value most about their optimal health and wellbeing, which is key to establishing the real motivation for change.

vision quote