Personal and Professional Development

As I discussed in my previous post about the Wheel of Health, your wellbeing encompasses more than just physical health. Today we will explore the importance of personal and professional development on your journey to optimal health. For many people, these two areas are closely related, which is why I have chosen to discuss them together.

Personal and professional endeavors can be a source of enjoyment and energy, or emotional drain and stress. Some individuals have personal lives that are fulfilling with family, friends and hobbies that provide joy and meaning, while others have not yet reached the place of contentment they desire. The same may be true professionally – some people have careers that are meaningful and resonate with their purpose and values in life, whereas others struggle in demanding jobs that provide little personal or professional rewards. There are also many people who struggle to find balance across these two domains. Regardless of where you are personally and professionally, these areas of your life can affect your health either positively or negatively.

Like other areas on the Wheel of Health, Personal and Professional Development is very personal and varies from person to person. In general, we are referring to whatever gives you meaning and purpose in life – those activities that give you a sense of fulfillment and joy. It may be your family or your work (or both!); it may be continuously learning new things or volunteering through your church. It can be relationships with family, friends or colleagues at the office. Personal and professional development means exploring your own values and finding out what brings you joy and meaning.

Personal Development

For some people, personal development may be tied very closely to their professional pursuits. For others, it may be very distinct. For almost all of us, optimal health may best be achieved by balancing the two, which we will explore later in this post.

There are several areas of the Wheel of Health that relate to personal development, such as spirituality, relationships and communication, and mindful awareness.  However, personal development goes beyond the Wheel and can include topics such as music, art, reading, travel, gardening, and other hobbies and intellectual pursuits. Activities that bring us pleasure and satisfaction enhance our sense of contentment, joy and overall wellbeing. These may be “doing” activities such as those mentioned above, but they can also include “being” activities – for example, star-gazing, sitting on the beach, or meditating on a mountaintop. All of these things can be sources of deep personal development.

Professional Development

For many people, being involved in meaningful work can bring a profound sense of satisfaction and joy. You may have heard the saying: “Do what you love and you’ll never work a day in your life.” These individuals have a sense of meaning and purpose, knowing they are contributing to the world in a way that has significant meaning to them and a positive impact on others. However, there are others who find themselves in careers or work that drains them, and it can negatively impact their health. Many times, dealing with stress, dissatisfaction or boredom with one’s work leads individuals to make poor choices around food, alcohol or drugs.  I have worked with several clients who, through exploration of all areas of the Wheel of Health, realized that their job was the root cause of their health problems, such as weight gain or lack of sleep. They chose to focus on finding new work that was less demanding and would allow them to prioritize their health and wellbeing.

Professional development can also entail taking stock of where you are and where you want to go in your professional endeavors. Perhaps it means going back to school for an advanced degree to move up the ladder at work – or shifting roles within your given profession to allow for more time with your family. For others, it may mean a complete change in career focus to better align with their values and goals.

Balancing Personal and Professional Development

Many people find it challenging to balance their personal goals with the demands of their professional endeavors. Finding enough time and energy to focus on both can be stressful. Often times, the demands of full-time work can leave us with little time or energy for family and our personal pursuits. For others who have given up careers to raise a family or pursue other goals, they may find that they miss feeling “productive” or that their skills are going to waste.

Being mindfully aware of how you have structured your life and the impact it is having on your physical, mental and emotional health can help you achieve optimal health. It is helpful to assess where you are with personal, career or life goals, particularly at times of transition or milestones. These may include work-life balance, financial goals, and personal growth that will support optimal wellbeing. Regular assessment of your goals can also reinforce healthy behavior choices.

Below are some questions that can help you develop greater awareness of how your personal and professional endeavors are fostering or hindering your optimal health. Feel free to choose the questions that are most relevant for you. Take time to reflect deeply, perhaps writing down your responses or sharing them with someone you trust.

  • If money and time were no object, what would you love to do that would bring you a profound sense of satisfaction, joy and/or purpose?

 

  • How balanced are your work (what you do to earn a living) and your personal interests? What would you need to do to bring them more into balance?

 

  • If you continue with your current balance of personal and professional development, including time and energy spent on each, how will your life be 5 years from now? 10 years from now?

 

  • Is there a dream that you would like to resurrect and pursue? How are you stopping yourself? What are some first steps you could take to start pursuing that dream?

 

The Wheel of Health and Your Optimal Health Journey

wheel2-878x1024Today I’d like to share an overview of the Duke Integrative Medicine Wheel of Health (WOH). This wheel provides a framework for creating your personalized health plan – and a map of your optimal health journey. We will explore the various parts of the wheel in-depth in subsequent posts, but for now, let’s look at the big picture.

The WOH represents the whole picture of your health and wellbeing. It is a multidimensional, whole person approach that considers body, mind and spirit. As you can see, it does not focus on just physical health. It goes beyond managing disease and instead emphasizes optimizing health.

Dimensions of the Wheel

You

At the center of the wheel is YOU, because health coaching is a person-centered process. Your health journey is driven by your values, goals and desires. As a coach, I won’t tell you what to do or not to do – you get to decide based on your priorities and what works for you.

Mindful Awareness

Surrounding the center of the wheel is Mindful Awareness. The concept of mindfulness – paying attention on purpose, in the present moment, and non-judgmentally – is a powerful tool and resource for behavior change.  Being more present and aware of what is happening to you and in you can help you respond to changes in your life in a more proactive, engaged way.

Self-Care

The green ring in the wheel represents the seven areas of self-care. People often focus their efforts here when making changes to their health behaviors. Evaluating your current and desired states in each of these areas can help you create a healthier life. These include:

Movement, Exercise and Rest – This area addresses physical activity, whether it be formal exercise (for example, running 30 minutes a day) or general activities of daily living (such as cleaning the house or grocery shopping). Just as important, it also incorporates the need for adequate rest (good sleep is vital!) and relaxation or “down time”.

Nutrition – In a nutshell, eating a balanced, healthy diet that fuels and nourishes your body and mind. There is no specific diet that is recommended. There are some key healthy eating strategies that we’ll discuss in a future post, but it is also based on what works for your body.

Personal and Professional Development –  It is helpful to assess where you are with personal, career or life goals, particularly at times of transition or milestones. These may include work-life balance, financial goals, and personal growth that will support optimal wellbeing. Regular assessment of your goals can reinforce healthy behavior choices.

Physical Environment – Studies have suggested that your surroundings at work and home can impact your health, either positively or negatively. Exposure to light, noise or toxins in your home or work space can have a major impact on how you feel physically and emotionally. On the other hand, a supportive, nurturing physical environment can enhance your sense of peace and wellness.

Relationships and Communication – Research demonstrates that positive relationships built on open, respectful communication with family, friends and colleagues can have a beneficial impact on your health. Identify those relationships in your life that fuel you and those that drain you. In doing so, you can invest in your positive connections and minimize or re-evaluate those relationships that don’t serve you.

Spirituality – This area is about finding purpose and meaning in something larger than oneself. For some people, it may include a religious affiliation. For others, it may be a connection to nature or the arts. Although the definition of spirituality is very personal in nature, the role that it plays in your life can transform your health.

Mind-Body Connection – This area relates back to the inner ring of Mindful Awareness. It focuses on mind-body practices that can help you be more present. Techniques include things that activate the body’s relaxation and healing response, like breathing practices, meditation, yoga, or guided imagery.

Professional Care

It is important to seek routine preventive medical care such as an annual physical exam, recommended cancer screenings (e.g., mammogram, colonoscopy) and vaccinations. In addition, you can supplement your usual medical care with complementary approaches such as acupuncture, massage, hypnosis or energy work. A primary goal of Integrative Medicine is to remove the distinction between conventional and complementary approaches and create one integrated approach to health care. In this model, patients and their providers work together to determine the most effective, evidence-based personalized health plan to achieve life-long wellbeing.