Finding your “why”

In continuing to explore the various stages of the health coaching process model, today I will review the second stage: identifying and prioritizing the elements of the client’s vision that are most important to them and reflect significant values in their life.

The purpose of exploring client values is twofold:
1. it sets the stage for determining specific areas the client would like to address, and
2. it helps establish their real motivation for behavior change

As most of us know, behavior change can be very difficult. It takes time, effort and discipline to establish new habits or break old habits. Therefore, connecting the behavior change to those things that are most important to the client will help them embrace the change and work through the obstacles and barriers they may encounter along their journey. I like to call this stage “finding your ‘why’” as it gets at the true reason(s) the client wants to change.

The values associated with a client’s health and wellbeing may include things like spending time with family, serving their community, or being a role model to their children. Their values may also tie into their faith and spiritual beliefs. The desire to change may be tied to short-term plans or longer-term goals. For example, a mother may desire to lose weight now in order to look and feel good at her child’s upcoming wedding, but she may also want to do so to have the energy to run around with her future grandchildren.

To help a client articulate their values, I typically ask one or more of the following questions:

  • What is important to you about your health and wellbeing?

 

  • What really matters to you in your life?

 

  • What brings you joy and happiness?

 

  • What values are you honoring as you move toward your vision of optimal health and wellbeing?

Some clients may initially find it difficult to answer these questions. Many times, they may seek coaching because they feel they “have to” or “should” change a particular behavior (e.g., lose weight, start exercising, stop smoking). By exploring values and what is most important to them about their health, they may identify a different area or behavior they want to change. Clients are more likely to be successful if they choose an area they want to change versus one they feel like they need to change for external reasons.

As mentioned earlier, one of the most important reasons to help a client identify their “why” is to help them work through the challenges and obstacles that are likely to arise on their way to better health. When a client is knee deep in the action phase, perhaps waking up at the crack of dawn to fit in their daily exercise, there are bound to be days when they don’t want to do it. It is on those days and at those times of lagging motivation when the client can pause and ask themselves, “Why am I doing this again?” – and they will have their answer.

 

what is your why