Maintaining the gains

As I discussed in my previous post, the path to change is seldom straight and easy. Even after a client has succeeded in sustaining their chosen health behavior over a period of months, they may still be susceptible to lapses or minor slips. During those times, it is critical for a coach to continue offering support and help the client determine what they have learned from their experience.

Maintenance occurs when a client has been regularly practicing the new behavior or action with no more than a few lapses or an occasional relapse after which they quickly and successfully return to regular practice. What started out as a goal has become a new habit. At that time, there are a few pathways for the client to consider:

 

  • The client may be ready to explore deeper commitment in the same focus area. For example, a client who went from being inactive to walking 3 days/week may wish to increase that practice to walking 5 days/week. Or they may choose to register for an activity such as a charity 5k walk.

 

  • The client may be ready to take on a new goal in a completely different area. Success in small goals often gives the client confidence to tackle more challenging behavior changes. For example, a client who is a casual smoker who increases their physical activity level may decide to quit smoking completely. Or a client who successfully reduces the amount of meat they consume may decide to go further and adopt a vegetarian or vegan diet.

 

  • The client may choose to complete coaching at this point now that they are able to successfully maintain the behavior change. Of course, the door is always open for them to return to coaching in the future if and when they want to take on a new focus area. However, I believe that the coaching process can also equip the client with the skills necessary to address future changes on their own. The skills they learn through the coaching process can be transferred to any habit or behavior they wish to change.

 

In the end, coaching is really a journey of self-discovery and exploration that empowers you, the individual, to achieve your highest level of health and wellbeing. There is no greater gift of self-love.

I hope you have enjoyed this series about the stages of the coaching process. Stay tuned for future posts about your favorite health and wellness topics!

 

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It all starts with a vision

Happy New Year! I hope that you all had a wonderful holiday season and are optimistic about the new adventures that 2019 will bring. I thought it would be helpful to kick off the new year by reviewing the stages of the health coaching process model, beginning today with the first stage: creating an optimal health vision.

Laying the foundation

As a health and wellness coach, my primary purpose is to help individuals learn how to optimize their health and wellbeing, with an emphasis on the latter. Miriam-Webster defines wellbeing as “the state of being happy, healthy, or prosperous.” Obviously, there is some subjectivity in that definition as health, happiness and prosperity may look different for everyone…which is one reason why the initial stage in the coaching process is for the client to identify their vision of optimal health and wellbeing.

The visioning stage provides an opportunity for the client to take a broad look at their current state of health and wellbeing in preparation for developing a personalized health plan, with goals and action steps. Visioning allows clients to think about the “big picture” of health and wellbeing in their life and helps serve as part of the motivation for change.

There are a number of different strategies that coaches can use to help clients identify their optimal health vision, such as:

  1. Sending written questions regarding vision to the client to complete ahead of time and then discuss during the next session. This approach may be helpful for clients that like to take time to think things through and process questions before sharing with the coach.

 

  1. Asking open-ended questions regarding vision during the coaching session. This method may be better suited for clients who do not like “homework” and/or enjoy processing by talking things through as they go. Some example questions include:

 

  • What is your vision of yourself in your greatest health?
  • What do you look like? How do you feel?
  • What inspires you about this vision of optimal health and wellbeing?
  • What does achieving your vision of optimal health make possible in your life?

 

  1. Offering a short, guided imagery exercise to assist the client in developing their health vision. I often use the “future self” exercise, in which clients are asked to imagine themselves sometime in the future when they have achieved their vision of optimal health. Clients then paint a picture of what that looks like by describing how they look and feel, the activities they are enjoying, who they are with and what health behaviors they are engaged in (e.g., exercise, eating healthy). If the client tends to be a visual person, I invite them to capture their vision on paper with words and/or images.

For many clients, identifying their vision of optimal health may be linked with a personal mission or life purpose. It may stimulate a sense of who they are meant to be or how they want to contribute to their community and beyond. Visioning allows clients to see how their specific focus of change serves their larger intention for themselves. And perhaps most importantly, it sets the stage for identifying specific goals and action steps that will help the client achieve their vision.

Although coaches help elicit a vision at the beginning of the coaching process, we return to visioning throughout the change process, especially after a client has initiated action. Behavior change is rarely a linear process and a client’s motivation to change will ebb and flow. It can be helpful to revisit the client’s vision after they have experienced positive changes, to reinforce how their action is serving their overall vision. Or revisiting the vision may help reignite their desire to change when they are feeling stagnant or stuck. Visioning is a key thread woven throughout the entire coaching process.

Stay tuned for the next part of the coaching process which is helping clients identify what they value most about their optimal health and wellbeing, which is key to establishing the real motivation for change.

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Gratitude

Although many of us get swept up in all the hoopla around Thanksgiving – the turkey and trimmings, the football games, the parades, and yes, even the holiday shopping – it behooves us to pause and remember what the holiday is really about: giving thanks, expressing gratitude for all that is good in our lives.

This recent Time magazine article highlights several benefits to our health and wellbeing from practicing gratitude, including being more patient and experiencing long-lasting happiness. Amazing how a few small acts, like saying thank you to your partner for washing the dishes or writing down three good things that happened to you each day, can reap such big benefits.

In the spirit of the holiday, I’d like to take a moment to share the top 5 things I am grateful for, today and every day:

  • My family, near and far, for keeping me grounded and helping me succeed.
  • My friends, for the joy and laughter as well as the hugs and support.
  • My home, for providing warmth, comfort and shelter.
  • My morning quiet time, when I can turn inward and just be.
  • My Nia practice, for helping me rediscover the joy of movement.

And one – actually two – more things, just for fun – my feline “goddesses,” Artemis and Athena (below left and right, respectively). These little kitties remind me every day to look at the world with wonder and curiosity – to see everything as if for the first time. They teach me patience by often testing my patience, but who can resist their sweet little faces?

I wish you and your loved ones a Happy and healthy Thanksgiving!

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